BIOL 0001. General Biology

Units: 4
Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 1A, CHEM 3A/3B, or higher level chemistry course with grade of "C" or better; AND completion of MATH D or equivalent with grade of "C" or better; AND eligibility for ENGL 11
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
First course in the General Biology sequence for biology majors and pre-allied health students. Covers general biological concepts, with an emphasis on cellular and molecular biology, genetics, and evolution. (C-ID BIOL 190) (CSU, UC)

BIOL 0002. Botany

Units: 4.5
Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 1 with grade of "C" or better; AND completion of MATH D or equivalent with grade of "C" or better
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 144 (54 lecture, 90 laboratory)
Introduction to botany, including classification, morphology, anatomy, physiology, diversity, ecology, and evolution emphasizing members of the Kingdoms Plantae, Fungi, Protista, and Prokaryotae. Topics relating to flowering plants stressed. Correlation of topics with scientific method and modern biological research. Non-life science majors see BIOL 14. (C-ID BIOL 155) (CSU, UC)

BIOL 0003. General Zoology

Units: 4.5
Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 1 or BIOL 33 with grade of "C" or better; AND completion of MATH D or equivalent with grade of "C" or better
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 144 (54 lecture, 90 laboratory)
Detailed survey of the animal kingdom stressing evolution and ecology of animals and functional anatomy of their major organ systems. Recommended for life science majors, premedical, preveterinary and related professional programs. (C-ID BIOL 150) (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0004. Microbiology

Units: 5
Prerequisite: Completion of high school chemistry, CHEM A, or higher level chemistry course with grade of "C" or better
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 11 strongly recommended
Hours: 162 (54 lecture, 108 laboratory)
Introduction to the biochemistry, morphology, physiology, genetics, and classification of microorganisms. Emphasis on the significance of microorganisms to human health and global ecology. Laboratory topics include traditional and modern techniques of microbial classification, recombinant DNA technology, and bacteriophage biology. Students enrolling in BIOL 4 after having taken BIOL 8A will lose credit for BIOL 8A. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0005. Human Anatomy

Units: 4
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 11
Advisory: Completion of BIOL 55, 56, HSCI 3, or previous science course with grade of "C" or better, or experience in health care field; completion of MATH D with grade of "C" or better; eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Structural organization, relationships among structures, and histology of the human body: gross and microscopic structure of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems, from cellular to organ system levels of organization. This is a rigorous course in human anatomy primarily intended for nursing, allied health, kinesiology, and other health related majors. Cadaver prosections used for instruction. Nonmajors see BIOL 55, 56, and 56L. Students enrolling in BIOL 5 after having taken BIOL 7A will lose credit for BIOL 7A. (C-ID BIOL 110B) (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0005X. Success in Anatomy

Unit: 1
Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 5
Hours: 18 lecture
Optional course for students concurrently enrolled in BIOL 5 to gain a deeper understanding of course material through discussions focused on anatomical concepts, terminology, and the implementation of anatomical knowledge to clinical and problem solving situations. Advanced study techniques, necessary for success in science courses, are modeled to strengthen student self-awareness, confidence, and ability to monitor learning. (CSU)

BIOL 0006. Human Physiology

Units: 5
Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 2A or 1A or 3A/3B; AND BIOL 5 or 7A/7B or 55 with grades of "C" or better
Advisory: Completion of MATH D with grade of "C" or better; completion of a non-majors general biology course with grade of "C" or better; and eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 126 (72 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Study of the physiology, integration, and homeostasis of the human body from chemical through organism levels. Organ systems covered are integumentary, muscular, nervous, sensory, cardiovascular, lymphatic and immune, respiratory, urinary, digestive, endocrine, and reproductive system. Experiments using living and non-living models are performed in lab using methods of data acquisition, recording systems, and analysis of data. Primarily intended for Nursing, Allied Health, Kinesiology, and other health or life science majors. (C-ID BIOL 120B) (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0007A. Human Anatomy I

Units: 2.5
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENGL 11
Advisory: Completion of BIOL 55, 56, HSCI 3, or previous science course with grade of "C" or better, or experience in health care field; completion of MATH D with grade of "C" or better; eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 72 (36 lecture, 36 laboratory)
Structure, relationships among structures, and histology of the human body from cellular to organ system levels of organization. Includes integumentary, skeletal, nervous, and sensory systems. Cadaver prosections are used for instruction. The sequence of BIOL 7A/7B is equivalent to BIOL 5. Students enrolling in BIOL 5 after having taken BIOL 7A will lose credit for BIOL 7A. (combined with BIOL 7B, C-ID BIOL 110B) (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0007B. Human Anatomy II

Units: 2.5
Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 7A with grade of "C" or better
Hours: 72 (36 lecture, 36 laboratory)
Structure, relationships among structures, and histology of the human body from cellular to organ system levels of organization. Includes muscle, cardiovascular, lymphatic, endocrine, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Cadaver prosections are used for instruction. The sequence of BIOL 7A/7B is equivalent to BIOL 5. (combined with BIOL 7A, C-ID BIOL 110B) (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0008A. Microbiology I

Units: 2.5
Prerequisite: Completion of high school chemistry, CHEM A, or higher level chemistry course with grade of "C" or better
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 11 strongly recommended
Hours: 81 (27 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Introduction to the biochemistry, morphology, classification and physiology of microorganisms, especially bacteria. Emphasis on the significance of microorganisms to human health and global ecology. The sequence of BIOL 8A/8B is equivalent to BIOL 4. Students enrolling in BIOL 4 after having taken BIOL 8A will lose credit for BIOL 8A. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0008B. Microbiology II

Units: 2.5
Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 8A with grade of "C" or better
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 11 strongly recommended
Hours: 81 (27 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Introduction to microbial genetics and metabolic regulation, viruses, microbial control, host defense, immunization, epidemiology, mechanisms of pathogenicity, and significance of microorganisms, especially bacteria and viruses. Emphasis on the significance of microorganisms to human health and global ecology. Laboratory topics include traditional and modern techniques of microbial classification, recombinant DNA technology, and bacteriophage biology. The sequence of BIOL 8A/8B is equivalent to BIOL 4. CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0010. Introduction to Biology

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Designed for non-life science majors desiring an introductory biology course without a lab. Introduces the main concepts of biology, covering molecular and cell biology, heredity and nature of genes, biotechnology, evolution, diversity of life, and principles of ecology. Students enrolling in BIOL 11 after having taken BIOL 10 will lose credit for BIOL 10. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0011. Concepts of Biology

Units: 4
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A and MATH 12
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Designed for non-life science majors desiring an introductory biology course with a lab. Introduces the main concepts of biology, covering molecular and cell biology, heredity and nature of genes, biotechnology, evolution, diversity of life, and principles of ecology. Students enrolling in BIOL 11 after having taken BIOL 10 will lose credit for BIOL 10. Not recommended for students who have completed BIOL 56 and 56L. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0013. Field Methods in Ecology

Units: 3
Formerly known as BIOL 13B
Advisory: Completion of BIOL 14 strongly recommended
Hours: 90 (36 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Introduction to methods for sampling and studying environmental parameters of ecosystems and organisms. Identification of microscopic and macroscopic organisms, quantitative and qualitative field research techniques and procedures applicable to environmental assessment and population monitoring. Field trips required. (CSU)

BIOL 0014. Natural History, Ecology and Conservation

Units: 4
Also known as ESS 0014
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 0001A
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Introduction to the study of biology and ecology of organisms and ecosystems of the world, with an emphasis on California. Special focus on significance of functioning ecosystems and human influence on biological environment. (CSU, UC)

BIOL 0015. Marine Biology

Units: 4
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 11
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Introduction to basic biological and ecological principles of major saltwater environments. Stresses conservation and appropriate utilization of marine resources. Designed for both science and non-science majors. Laboratory hours partially fulfilled by required field trips. Hiking and boat travel may be necessary. Camping and entrance fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation on field trips. (CSU, UC)

BIOL 0016A. Local Ecosystems of Placer County

Units: 0.5
Hours: 13 (7 lecture, 6 laboratory)
Field study that introduces local natural areas and their inhabitants. Selected ecosystems in Placer County are investigated in the field to identify and study the characteristic plants and animals and discover their relationships with the physical environment. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016B. Local Ecosystems of Nevada County

Units: 0.5
Hours: 13 (7 lecture, 6 laboratory)
Field study that introduces local natural areas and their inhabitants. Selected ecosystems within Nevada County are investigated in the field to identify and study the characteristics of plants and animals and discover their relationships with the physical environment. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016C. Vernal Pools and the California Prairie

Units: 0.5
Hours: 13 (7 lecture, 6 laboratory)
Field study that explores the ecological past, present, and future of California's Great Valley ecosystems. Emphasis on remaining natural areas and conservation efforts. Special attention given to grasslands and vernal pool habitats. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016D. Biology of Waterfowl and Marsh Birds

Units: 0.5
Hours: 13 (7 lecture, 6 laboratory)
Field identification and observation of marsh birds (primarily ducks, geese, swans, and wading birds). Includes general waterfowl biology and ecology. Emphasizes evolution, migration, reproductive cycles, current population trends, and habitat needs. Operational needs and conflicts of national and local wildlife refuge system are discussed. Students may need to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016E. Ecology of the Sierran Conifer Forest

Units: 0.5
Hours: 13 (7 lecture, 6 laboratory)
Field study that introduces forest biology/ecology, emphasizing interrelationships between the Sierran forest inhabitants (animals, plants, fungi) and their environment. Study sites include a variety of forest and other associated mountain ecological communities. Depending on season offered, special topics may include: fungi biology, wildflower ecology, tree anatomy and physiology, forest nutrient cycles, forest birds, and soil organisms. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016G. Field Paleontology and Ancient Environments

Units: 1-4
Also known as ESCI 16G
Hours: 30 (12 lecture, 18 laboratory) per unit
Investigations into the ecology of environments in the geologic past through field work at fossil sites. Comparisons/contrasts made between ancient (fossil) communities and the current (living) communities of selected study sites. Differences and similarities between the plants and animals used as evidence to reconstruct ancient ecological communities. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016H. Ecology of the Mendocino Coast

Unit: 1
Hours: 30 (12 lecture, 18 laboratory)
Field study examining the Northern California Coast and its diverse ecological environments. Using the Fort Bragg/Mendocino/Fort Ross areas, investigates the biological relationships found in: the redwood, riparian, pygmy, mixed evergreen and closed-cone pine forests, and the shoreline communities of tidepool, sandy beach, dune, prairie and scrub. Plants, animals, environmental factors and effects of human activities are assessed for each of the ecological communities examined. Hiking may be necessary. Camping and entrance fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016I. Biology of Mono Lake and the Great Basin

Unit: 1
Hours: 30 (12 lecture, 18 laboratory)
Field study investigating the natural history and ecology of the Great Basin with special emphasis on Mono Lake and the Mono Basin. Examines physical, biological, historical, and ecological aspects that make the Mono Basin unique. Emphasis on biological and ecological aspects of the Mono Basin. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016J. Ecology of Point Reyes National Seashore

Unit: 1
Hours: 30 (12 lecture, 18 laboratory)
Field study exploring the coastal mosaic of Point Reyes National Seashore and vicinity. Using the ecological communities present (forests, shoreline, pond and prairie), this area provides a rich biological "laboratory" to study its unique organisms and natural ecosystems, including grasslands, mudflats, forests, marshes, cliffs, beach, and dune sites. Depending on season offered, emphasis may be on wildflowers, mushrooms, owls, elk, reptiles or other life forms. Hiking may be necessary. Camping and entrance fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016K. Foothill Ecology of the Sierra Nevada

Unit: 1.5
Hours: 45 (18 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field study investigating the ecology of the foothills to mid-montane zones of the Sierra Nevada. Focus on major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and ecological islands from 500 to 6000 feet elevation. Camping fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016L. Aquatic and Riparian Environments of California Waterways

Unit: 1.5
Hours: 45 (18 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field study of the biological diversity and ecology of aquatic environments and the biology of water life. Focuses on the "water cycle" and its biological importance and human interactions. Ponds, vernal pools, streams, rivers, lakes, springs, meadows, bogs, marshes (fresh and salt), shorelines, deltas, and bay/estuary environments are investigated. Study sites may include Lake Tahoe, the American River, San Francisco Bay and other aquatic locations. Hiking or boat travel may be necessary. Camping, entrance and transportation fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016M. Marine Mammals and Birds

Unit: 1.5
Hours: 45 (18 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field study of the biology of marine mammals and marine birds. Shore and pelagic organisms are studied, emphasizing California-associated species and their habitats. Field and lecture topics include: ecology, evolution, behavior, reproduction, distribution, anatomy, physiology, identification, and population status of whales, true and eared seals, sea otters, shore, bay and pelagic birds. Hiking and boat travel may be necessary. Camping and entrance fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016N. Ecology of the Modoc Plateau

Unit: 1.5
Hours: 45 (18 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field ecology of volcanic and cold desert landscapes found in the Modoc Plateau region of California/Oregon. Ecosystems and environmental relationships stressed. Areas of emphasis include forest ecology, fresh water marsh/watershed, environmental factors, volcanic geology, plant succession, and human influences. Study sites include Lava Beds National Monument and Tule Lake Wildlife Refuge. Hiking may be necessary. Camping, entrance and transportation fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016O. Ecology of the High Sierra and White Mountain

Units: 2
Hours: 54 (27 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field study which examines high-elevation mountain ecosystems using the high Sierra Nevada and White-Inyo Mountain Range of California as specific study sites. Observation and study of sub-alpine and alpine ecosystems like forests, montane chaparral, meadows, aquatic habitats, alpine tundra, and fell-fields. Fees may be required for camping and other activities. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016P. Death Valley and Desert Ecosystems

Units: 2
Hours: 54 (27 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field study that explores the unique desert ecosystems of Death Valley National Park and nearby areas. Extreme differences of elevation from high mountains to below sea level provide a rich variety of desert environments, plants, and animals. Field work emphasizes identification of animals and plants (many unique to these exotic desert habitats), their special physical and behavioral adaptations to the harsh desert climate and habitats, and the effects of human activities upon the fragile desert ecosystems. Hiking may be necessary. Camping, entrance and transportation fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016Q. Ecology of Mid-Western North America

Units: 2
Hours: 54 (27 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field introduction to ecology of the major biomes, communities and life zones of the Midwestern and Western regions of the United States, emphasizing plains grasslands, montane forests, desert badlands, alpine zones, and aquatic habitats. Each ecological area explored as to its climate, common plants and animals, range, distribution, relationships, geology, historical changes, paleoecology and other environmental factors. Fossil and other evidence of past environments compared to present communities. Hiking may be necessary. Camping, entrance and transportation fees may be required. (CSU)

BIOL 0016R. Canyon Lands of the Southwest

Units: 2
Hours: 54 (27 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field biology and ecology of the Southwestern Canyon lands and semi-arid regions associated with the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce and nearby natural areas. Local plants, animals, microenvironments, river systems, human impacts and resource management and special biotic relationships with the canyon landscapes emphasized. Hiking may be necessary. Camping, entrance and transportation fees may be required. (CSU)

BIOL 0016T. Coastal Habitats of Northern California

Units: 2
Hours: 54 (27 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field course exploring the unique biological and ecological features of the California north coast, which may include Redwoods National Park, Prairie Creek Redwoods, and Big Lagoon. Coastal ecosystems studied include the redwood forest, coastal grassland, rocky tidepool, marshes, stream, bog, coastal strand, and mixed-evergreen forest (their climate, geology, ecology, and plant and animal diversity). The human impacts of a growing population with resource demands discussed. Hiking may be necessary. Camping, entrance and transportation fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016U. Coastal Habitats of Central California

Units: 2
Hours: 54 (27 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field study of the unique features of the central California coast between Morro Bay, Big Sur, Monterey Bay, and Point Reyes National Seashore. Coastal habitats explored, identifying coastal plants, animals, and geologic processes, and emphasizing the interrelationships characteristic of coastal environments. Environments studied include sandy beach, ocean bay, tidepool, mudflat, coastal forests, oak woodland, grasslands and coastal scrub. Areas are contrasted with other coastal regions. Human impacts and living styles viewed as they effect the natural environments. Hiking and boat travel may be necessary. Camping, entrance and transportation fees may be required. (CSU)

BIOL 0016V. Deserts of Southern California

Units: 2
Hours: 54 (27 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Explore and study the "hot" deserts of Southern California (the Mojave and Sonoran/Colorado Deserts and regional variations), discovering their unique animals and plants which are adapted to these extreme and beautiful environments. Deserts compared to nearby coastal habitats or the desert ecosystems in Arizona (depending on local conditions). California study sites visited include, at least, Joshua Tree National Park, Mojave Desert, Salton Sea, and Anza-Borrego State Park. Focuses upon the interdependency between the physical environments and the biological inhabitants that live there. Hiking may be necessary. Camping, entrance and transportation fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016W. Biology/Ecology of the Klamath and the Southern Cascade

Units: 2
Hours: 54 (27 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field study that introduces the biology/ecology of the Klamath and southern Cascade Mountain Ranges. Study sites include a variety of locations and habitats such as Mt. Lassen, Crater Lake, and Marble Mountains. Special topics include ecological succession and montane biogeography. Fees for camping and transportation may be required. (CSU)

BIOL 0016Y. Ecology of Selected Wilderness Ecosystems

Units: 2
Hours: 54 (27 lecture, 27 laboratory)
Field study of selected wilderness sites, comparing their biological inventory, ecological relationships, physical environments, and sensitivity to human interactions and activities. Both qualitative and quantitative field survey techniques are used to record ecological data at each study site. Management techniques, history, and objectives of wilderness preservation and resource use conflicts are emphasized. Camping and transportation fees may be required. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0016Z. Ecology of the American River

Units: 0.5
Hours: 13 (7 lecture, 6 laboratory)
Field study of the aquatic, riparian, and associated ecosystems of Sierra Nevada river systems with specific attention on the American River system. Students may be required to provide their own transportation. (CSU)

BIOL 0021. Introduction to Plant Science

Units: 4
Also known as AGRI 156
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Emphasizes structure, growth, physiology and reproduction of flowering plants and their responses to modifications and environment; including propagation, media, soil and plant nutrition. Explores the interrelationship of plant science with other life sciences and technology. Applies principles of plant science to agricultural systems. (CSU, UC)

BIOL 0023. Wildflower Identification

Unit: 1
Hours: 26 (13 lecture, 13 activity)
Plant identification, terminology, keying, uses, and ecology. Field trips may require ability to hike moderate distances on unlevel ground. (CSU)

BIOL 0024. Wildland Trees and Shrubs (Dendrology)

Units: 4
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Botanical characteristics, taxonomy, physiology, and community relationships of the major trees and shrubs in the Western United States. Discussion of commercial uses and geographic ranges of these plants. Identifying specimens under field conditions and using herbarium specimens. (CSU)

BIOL 0028. Independent Study

Units: 1-3
Designed for students interested in furthering their knowledge at an independent study level in an area where no specific curriculum offering is currently available. Independent study might include, but is not limited to, research papers, special subject area projects, and research projects. See Independent Study page in catalog. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0030. Introduction to Ornithology

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Introduction to the general ecology, evolution, and physiology of birds, with an emphasis on northern California avifauna. (CSU, UC)

BIOL 0033. Introduction to Zoology

Units: 4
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
A survey of the animal kingdom emphasizing the evolution, structure, function, ecology, and natural history of major groups of animals. Designed for nonscience majors. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0035. Introduction to Entomology

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Introduction to the general ecology, evolution, and physiology of insects, with examples from the insect fauna of northern California. Describes the key relationships (medical, agricultural, etc.) insects have with humans. Recommended for general education students or other majors interested in entomology. (CSU, UC)

BIOL 0036. Introduction to Mammalogy

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Introduction to the general ecology, evolution, and physiology of mammals, with an emphasis on species of northern California. Topics include: identifying characteristics, local species, ecological relationships, human interactions, and behavioral, structural, and physiological adaptations. Recommended for general education students or other majors interested in mammals. (CSU)

BIOL 0055. General Human Anatomy and Physiology

Units: 4
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 11 strongly recommended
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
An overview of the basic anatomy and physiology of all body systems. Designed for non-science majors and those interested in human anatomy and physiology. Experiments and observations performed on models, nonliving systems, and oneself. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0056. Biology: A Human Perspective

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 11 strongly recommended
Hours: 54 lecture
Principles of biology and how they relate to humans. Emphasis on the human organism, including anatomy, physiology, medicine, research, genetics, evolution, ecology and human impacts on the environment. Not recommended for Biological Sciences majors or students who have completed BIOL 11. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0056L. Biology: A Human Perspective Laboratory

Unit: 1
Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 56
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 11 strongly recommended
Hours: 54 laboratory
Optional laboratory course to be taken with BIOL 56. Topics parallel lecture course, including anatomy, physiology, medicine, research, genetics, evolution, ecology and human impacts on the environment. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

BIOL 0095. Internship in Biological Sciences

Units: 0.5-4
Designed for advanced students to work in an area related to their educational or occupational goal. Provides new on-the-job technical training under the direction of a worksite supervisor, allowing students to expand knowledge and skills in the chosen field. Mandatory orientation session and faculty approval to determine eligibility. Students may earn up to a total of 16 units in internship courses (any course numbered 95 and PDEV 94). (CSU-with unit limitation)