Contact Information

Contact Information
Division
Liberal Arts
Dean
Anne Fleischmann (Interim)
Associate Dean
Lynn Medeiros (Interim)
Location
Division Office
W 107, Rocklin Campus

Overview

Philosophy concerns the study of fundamental questions that arise in different areas of human experience, thought, or practice. Philosophy is the basis of a sound humanistic or liberal arts education. The Philosophy program aims to make this natural activity of thought both richer and more systematic. Courses are offered which provide opportunities for self development and the building of a coherent outlook and critical reason. In addition, the lower division prerequisites for a four-year philosophy major are offered.

TRANSFER MAJOR REQUIREMENTS in Philosophy are available in the Counseling Center. In all cases, students should consult with a counselor for specific transfer requirements.

Faculty

Vernon J. Martin

Professor, Philosophy

B.A., University of California, Santa Cruz
M.A., University of North Texas

Johnnie D. Terry

Professor, Humanities/Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies/Philosophy/Women and Gender Studies

B.A., San Diego State University
M.A., San Diego State University

Degrees/Certificates

Associate Degree for Transfer

Associate Degree

Philosophy for Transfer

AA-T Degree

Philosophy is a broadly based discipline that examines the fundamental questions that arise in disparate areas of human experience. Courses are both historically and topically organized and emphasize the analysis of primary sources, the importance of critical thinking, the relationship between conclusions, justifications and logic. By developing reasoning skills, students will strengthen clarity of language usage, fortify argumentation skills and master the language and topics of the discipline of philosophy.

The Associate in Arts in Philosophy for Transfer degree (AA-T) prepares students to transfer into the CSU system to complete a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy or a major deemed similar by a CSU campus. Students earning an associate degree for transfer and meeting the CSU minimum transfer admission requirements are guaranteed admission with junior standing to the CSU system, but not to a particular campus or major. Upon transfer, students will be required to complete no more than 60 additional prescribed units to earn a bachelor’s degree.

To earn the Associate in Arts in Philosophy for Transfer degree, students must complete 60 CSU-transferable semester units with a minimum grade point average of 2.0, including both of the following:

The exact wording of the law pertaining to associate degrees for transfer may be found in Education Code Section 66746.

It is highly recommended that, prior to transferring, students complete courses that satisfy the CSU United States History, Constitution and American Ideals graduation requirement. In all cases, students should consult with a counselor for more information on university admission and transfer requirements.

RESTRICTION: International coursework from non-United States regionally accredited institutions cannot be applied to associate degrees for transfer.

Required Courses
PHIL 0002Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics3
or PHIL 0006 Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality
PHIL 0012Introduction to Symbolic Logic3
Select 9 units from the following or unused course from the preceding area:9
Introduction to Critical Thinking
Philosophy of Religion
Introduction to Asian Philosophy
History of Ancient Greek Philosophy
History of Modern Philosophy
Introduction to the Philosophy of Science
Select 3 units from the following or unused course from the preceding area:3
Introduction to Philosophy of Women in Western Cultures
Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy
Introduction to Environmental Ethics
Introduction to Atheism
Total Units18

Philosophy

AA Degree

The Philosophy Department serves a diverse student population in preparation for upper division coursework in Philosophy at a four-year university as well as through offering general education courses for non-philosophy majors. The AA degree in Philosophy will prepare students for upper-division work in Philosophy by acquainting them with the relevant terminology and conceptual positions with regards to the major subdivisions of the discipline: Metaphysics, Epistemology, Axiology and Logic. Courses are offered which provide opportunities for self-development and the building of a coherent outlook and critical reason. In all cases, students should consult with a counselor for more information on university admission and transfer requirements. Students must fulfill the following major requirements with grades of “C” or better, complete a minimum of 60 degree-applicable semester units (12 of which must be completed at Sierra College) with a grade point average of at least 2.0 and complete one of the following three general education patterns:

Required Courses
PHIL 0012Introduction to Symbolic Logic3
PHIL 0020History of Ancient Greek Philosophy3
PHIL 0021History of Modern Philosophy3
Select 12 units from the following:12
Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics
Introduction to Critical Thinking
Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality
Philosophy of Religion
Introduction to Asian Philosophy
Introduction to Philosophy of Women in Western Cultures
Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy
Introduction to Environmental Ethics
Introduction to the Philosophy of Science
Total Units21

Courses

Understanding course descriptions

PHIL 0002. Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
The concept of morality and values, Western systems of ethics including Virtue Ethics, Utilitarianisms, Kantian ethics, Feminist Moral Theory and their application to contemporary moral dilemmas. (C-ID PHIL 120) (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0004. Introduction to Critical Thinking

Units: 3
Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1A with grade of "C" or better
Hours: 54 lecture
A study of the principles of inductive and deductive inference and their practical applications in everyday situations such as analyzing, criticizing, and advocating ideas, evaluation of arguments, and problem solving. Examines the use of language, formal and informal fallacies, syllogistic argument forms and the scientific method. Develops the ability to integrate principles of critical thinking with the techniques of effective written argument. (C-ID PHIL 110) (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0006. Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Introduction to the method and primary problems of philosophy including argumentation, conceptual analysis, analysis and evaluation of fundamental assumptions and principles of various philosophical systems and philosophical interpretation of primary texts on topics from epistemology and metaphysics. (C-ID PHIL 100) (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0010. Philosophy of Religion

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Analysis of the major philosophical issues raised by, but not limited to traditional Western religion. Includes an examination of the arguments for God's existence and nature, immortality, the problem of evil, miracles, rationality of religious belief, the relation of faith to reason, and theories on the meaning of the religious language. (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0012. Introduction to Symbolic Logic

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Introduction to the principles of deductive reasoning including formal techniques of sentential and predicate logic. (C-ID PHIL 210) (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0013. Introduction to Asian Philosophy

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Major philosophies of Asia including Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. Focuses on issues such as immortality, the nature of reality, god, the self, society, transcendence and morality. Also looks at the influences of Eastern Philosophy on Western Culture. (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0020. History of Ancient Greek Philosophy

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
A study of the origin and rise of Western Philosophy from the pre-Socratic philosophers, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, up to the Hellenistic and Medieval periods. (C-ID PHIL 130) (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0021. History of Modern Philosophy

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Sixteenth through Eighteenth century philosophy with emphasis on broad epistemological or metaphysical theories, developments of empiricism and rationalism from Descartes to Kant. (C-ID PHIL 140) (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0027. Introduction to Philosophy of Women in Western Cultures

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Introduction to the concepts of womanhood and feminism in mythic, classic, medieval and major philosophical traditions. Emphasis on the images, roles and beliefs about women found in the humanities and philosophy with respect to their impact and contemporary relevance. (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0028. Independent Study

Units: 1-3
Designed for students interested in furthering their knowledge at an independent study level in an area where no specific curriculum offering is currently available. Independent study might include, but is not limited to, research papers, special subject area projects, and research projects. See Independent Study page in catalog. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

PHIL 0030. Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy

Units: 3
Hours: 54 lecture
Major philosophical issues surrounding the nature of society and justifications for the authority of the state. Focuses on how the concepts of the common good, individual rights, liberty, equality, and democracy relate to notions of justice, private property and the legitimate use of state power. (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0060. Introduction to Environmental Ethics

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
Philosophical survey of the ethical questions and issues raised when considering the relationship between human beings and the environment. Topics include the moral standing of animals, land use and preservation policy, growth and sustainability, and environmental justice. Theoretical approaches include deep ecology, social ecology, ecofeminism, multicultural perspectives, and environmental pragmatism. (CSU, UC)

PHIL 0065. Introduction to the Philosophy of Science

Units: 3
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
The philosophical foundations of science such as criteria for distinguishing between science and pseudo-science, questions concerning scientific progress, justification of scientific hypotheses, the theory-dependence of observation, the nature of scientific revolutions, the possibility of objectivity and the challenges of relativism, feminism and marginalization. (CSU, UC)

Program Student Learning Outcomes (PSLOs)

  • Read and critique philosophical texts.
  • Apply the disciplinary language of philosophy to philosophical issues.
  • Describe and analyze core philosophical problems, their metaphysical presuppositions and practical consequences.
  • Craft a clear, coherent, and cogent philosophical essay.