Contact Information

Contact Information
Division
Liberal Arts
Dean
Anne Fleischmann (Interim)
Associate Dean
Lynn Medeiros (Interim)
Location
Division Office
W 107, Rocklin Campus

Overview

Psychology is the scientific discipline concerned with the study of behavior. Courses are designed to give students academic preparation in several areas of Psychology while concurrently providing material that can be usefully applied to their own lives.

TRANSFER MAJOR REQUIREMENTS in Psychology are available in the Counseling Center. In all cases, students should consult with a counselor for specific transfer requirements. Four-year graduates in Psychology are qualified for careers in probation, juvenile counseling, rehabilitation and several other fields in the private sector and in government agencies that relate to the helping services.

Faculty

Katharine L. Campi

Assistant Professor, Psychology

B.S., State University of New York at Cortland
M.A., University of California, Davis
Ph.D., University of California, Davis

Stephanie M. Coday

Professor, Psychology/Women and Gender Studies

B.A., San Diego State University
M.A., Alliant International University

Brigitte Elder

Professor, Psychology

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles
M.S., University of California, Davis
Ph.D., University of California, Davis

Robert C. Lennartz

Professor, Psychology

B.S., University of Southern California
Ph.D., University of California, Irvine

Jeanne Rachelle Soles

Professor, Psychology/Women and Gender Studies

B.A., California State University, Fresno
M.A., Fresno Pacific University

Kathleen A. Taylor

Professor, Psychology/Women and Gender Studies

B.A., California State University, Sacramento
M.A., California State University, Sacramento
M.A., University of California, Davis
Ph.D., University of California, Davis

Soni Verma

Professor, Psychology/Women and Gender Studies

B.A., Lady Shri Ram College for Women
M.A., Delhi University
M.Phil., National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences

Dean A. Yoshizumi

Professor, Psychology

B.A., California State University, Fullerton
M.A., California State University, Los Angeles
Ph.D., University of Iowa

Degrees/Certificates

Associate Degree for Transfer

Associate Degree

Psychology for Transfer

AA-T Degree

Psychology is defined as the scientific study of behavior. The degree program allows students to utilize research methods; evaluate the credibility of research, theories and applications; understand the core fields, paradigms and theories; apply psychological concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings and historical trends to questions and issues in personal experience and contemporary society; and understand the ethical standards in academic and applied psychology.

The Associate in Arts in Psychology for Transfer degree (AA-T) prepares students to transfer into the CSU system to complete a bachelor’s degree in Psychology or a major deemed similar by a CSU campus. Students earning an associate degree for transfer and meeting the CSU minimum transfer admission requirements are guaranteed admission with junior standing to the CSU system, but not to a particular campus or major. Upon transfer, students will be required to complete no more than 60 additional prescribed units to earn a bachelor’s degree.

To earn the Associate in Arts in Psychology for Transfer degree, students must complete 60 CSU-transferable semester units with a minimum grade point average of 2.0, including both of the following:

The exact wording of the law pertaining to associate degrees for transfer may be found in Education Code Section 66746.

It is highly recommended that, prior to transferring, students complete courses that satisfy the CSU United States History, Constitution and American Ideals graduation requirement. In all cases, students should consult with a counselor for more information on university admission and transfer requirements.

RESTRICTION: International coursework from non-United States regionally accredited institutions cannot be applied to associate degrees for transfer.

Required Courses
PSYC 0100General Principles of Psychology3
PSYC 0105Research Methods in Psychology4
PSYC 0142Introduction to Psychological Statistics3-4
or MATH 0013 Elementary Statistics
Select 4 units from the following:4
Concepts of Biology
Biology: A Human Perspective
and Biology: A Human Perspective Laboratory
Introduction to Biopsychology
and Biopsychology Laboratory
Select 3 units from the following:3
Critical Thinking and Writing about Literature
Social Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Select 3-4 units from the following or any unused course from the preceding area:3-4
Navigating Psychology: The Major and Careers
Abnormal Psychology
Psychology of Women
Human Sexuality
Alcohol, Drugs and Society
Cultural Psychology
Total Units20-22

Psychology

AA or AS Degree

The Psychology major provides preparation for upper-division coursework in Psychology at a four-year university. The degree program allows students to develop an understanding of the biological, cognitive and social aspects of human behavior as well as the methodological and experimental practices in the field. Students should choose the emphasis or track appropriate to the transfer institution or area of interest. In all cases, students should consult with a counselor for more information on university admission and transfer requirements. Students must fulfill the following major requirements with grades of “C” or better, complete a minimum of 60 degree-applicable semester units (12 of which must be completed at Sierra College) with a grade point average of at least 2.0 and complete one of the following three general education patterns:

Required Courses
PSYC 0100General Principles of Psychology3
PSYC 0105Research Methods in Psychology4
PSYC 0142Introduction to Psychological Statistics3-4
or MATH 0013 Elementary Statistics
Select 9 units from the following:9
Physical Anthropology
Cultural Anthropology
General Biology
Human Physiology
Introduction to Biology
Concepts of Biology
Biology: A Human Perspective
Social Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Abnormal Psychology
Introduction to Biopsychology
Biopsychology Laboratory
Psychology of Adjustment
Psychology of Women
Human Sexuality
Psychology and Film
Environmental Psychology
Total Units19-20

Courses

Understanding course descriptions

PSYC 0028. Independent Study

Units: 1-3
Designed for students interested in furthering their knowledge at an independent study level in an area where no specific curriculum offering is currently available. Independent study might include, but is not limited to, research papers, special subject area projects, and research projects. See Independent Study page in catalog. (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

PSYC 0100. General Principles of Psychology

Units: 3
Hours: 54 lecture
Introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Focuses on the exploration of major psychological theories and concepts, methods, and research findings in psychology. Topics include the biological bases of behavior, perception, cognition and consciousness, learning, memory, emotion, motivation, development, personality, social psychology, psychological disorders and therapeutic approaches, and applied psychology. (C-ID PSY 110) (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0102. Navigating Psychology: The Major and Careers

Unit: 1
Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 100 with grade of "C" or better
Hours: 18 lecture
Provides an overview of the discipline of psychology, including expectations for the psychology major, and career options in various areas, such as academic psychology, applied behavior analysis, counseling and mental health, education, industrial-organizational psychology and related fields. Students design plans of study and clarify their career goals through activities such as interviewing a professional in the field of psychology, resume writing, and interviewing. (CSU)

PSYC 0103. Social Psychology

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 3
Hours: 54 lecture
Study of human interaction with emphasis on the individual within a social context. Topics include development of the self, social perception, interpersonal attraction, prejudice and discrimination, attitude change, moral development, altruism, aggression, social influence, power and leadership, and interaction in groups. (C-ID PSY 170) (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0104. Developmental Psychology

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 4
Advisory: Completion of PSYC 100 with grade of "C" or better
Hours: 54 lecture
An overview of development from conception to death. Includes socioemotional, language and cognitive development, nature versus nurture, attachment, gender role development, and family structures. Examines psychological theories that apply to the lifespan. A multicultural and multiethnic approach is stressed and the differences in child parent interaction are explored in these contexts. (C-ID PSY 180) (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0105. Research Methods in Psychology

Units: 4
Formerly known as PSYC 5
Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 100 with grade of "C" or better; completion of PSYC 142 or MATH 13 with grade of "C" or better
Advisory: Completion of ENGL 1A with grade of "C" or better
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Introduction to research methodology, experimental design, and hypothesis testing in the behavioral sciences. Includes the execution, analysis (with statistical software), interpretation, and reporting of individual research projects. (C-ID PSY 205B) (CSU, UC)Formerly known as PSYC 5
Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 100 with grade of "C" or better; completion of PSYC 142 or MATH 13 with grade of "C" or better
Advisory: Completion of ENGL 1A with grade of "C" or better
Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 laboratory)
Description: Introduction to research methodology, experimental design, and hypothesis testing in the behavioral sciences. Includes the execution, analysis (with statistical software), interpretation, and reporting of individual research projects. (C-ID PSY 205B) (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0106. Psychology of Adjustment

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 6
Hours: 54 lecture
Basic theories of personal and social adjustment. Use of psychological principles and methods in adapting to the challenges of life. Topics include self image and self esteem, interpersonal relations, stress management, mental health and illness, and approaches to personal growth. (C-ID PSY 115) (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0107. Abnormal Psychology

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 7
Advisory: Completion of PSYC 100 with grade of "C" or better; Eligibility for ENGL 1A and ENGL 11
Hours: 54 lecture
Introduction to descriptive psychopathology: the origin, nature, and treatment of psychological and behavioral disorders, including discussion of relevant ethical and diagnostic issues. Major topics include research methods, schizophrenia, anxiety-related disorders, trauma- and stressor-related disorders, depressive disorders, bipolar disorders, obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, substance use and addictive disorders, gender dysphoria, and conflicting models of psychopathology. (C-ID PSY 120) (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0108. Psychology of Death and Dying

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 8
Hours: 54 lecture
An investigation of beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors associated with death, dying and bereavement. Terminal illness, suicide, euthanasia, last rites, legal aspects, death anxiety, cross-cultural beliefs and various philosophical views on the phenomenon of death are explored. (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0110. Psychology of Intimate Relationships and Family

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 10
Also known as HDEV 21
Hours: 54 lecture
Study of the meaning and functions of intimate relationships and family. Consideration given to the nature of commitments, sexuality, alternative relationships, communication, conflict resolution, economics, parenting, crises, and marital separation. Recommended for majors in Human Development and Family and for those in human service careers. (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0127. Psychology of Women

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 27
Hours: 54 lecture
Study of the psychological effects of society upon women including biology, culture, social processes, and personality. Emphasis placed on what it means to grow-up female in different contexts with particular emphasis on the effects of culture, class, and ethnicity. (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0130. Human Sexuality

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 30
Hours: 54 lecture
Overview of human sexuality from birth through adulthood: Covers major topics such as gender, sexual anatomy, sexually-transmitted infections, sexual response and disorders, sexual orientation, sexual coercion, and commercial sex. (C-ID PSY 130) (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0140. Introduction to Biopsychology

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 40
Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 100 with grade of "C" or better
Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Hours: 54 lecture
An introduction to biopsychology focusing on the relationship between the nervous system and behavior. Emphasis on physiological, biochemical, and neuroanatomical foundations of behavior and mental processes. Topics include the central nervous system function and its relation to psychoactive drug effects, sensory/perceptual processes, sleep and dreaming, learning phenomena, memory mechanisms, human communication disorders, and abnormal behavior. (C-ID PSY 150) (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0140L. Biopsychology Laboratory

Unit: 1
Formerly known as PSYC 40L
Corequisite: Completion with grade of "C" or better or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 140
Hours: 54 laboratory
This course focuses on the applied study of the nervous system and its connection to behavior. Specific topics include organization of the brain, anatomy and physiology of the neuron and an examination of sensory motor systems and states of consciousness. Students are introduced to sheep brain and cow eye dissection procedures, interactive computer simulation programs and lab experiments including EEG and EMG data collection. (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0142. Introduction to Psychological Statistics

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 42
Prerequisite: Completion of MATH D with grade of "C" or better
Hours: 54 lecture
Statistical procedures used for experimental analysis in the social and behavioral sciences. Descriptive and correlational statistics, parametric and nonparametric inference tests, and current controversies in hypothesis testing. (C-ID MATH 110) (C-ID SOCI 125) (CSU, UC-with unit limitation)

PSYC 0150. Alcohol, Drugs and Society

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 50
Hours: 54 lecture
The use, misuse, and abuse of all major families of psychoactive drugs, including opioids, stimulants, tobacco, marijuana, hallucinogens, alcohol, psychotherapeutic drugs, and sedative-hypnotics. Topics covered include cross-cultural usage, theories of addiction and treatment, government regulation, and mechanisms of drug action. (CSU)

PSYC 0160. Psychology and Film

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 60
Hours: 54 lecture
Analysis of a selection of contemporary films that have played a critical role in shaping and reflecting cultural assumptions and fears. Emphasis on abnormal mental states and processes, social psychology, substance abuse, and ethics. Viewing of films, reading from psychology and psycholinguistics, and discussion included. (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0170. Environmental Psychology

Units: 3
Formerly known as PSYC 70
Hours: 54 lecture
Explores the dynamic relationship between humans and the natural world. Includes psychological research on how behavior impacts the natural environment and how the natural environment impacts behavior. Emphasis is on using this knowledge to promote sustainable practices. (CSU, UC)

PSYC 0180. Cultural Psychology

Units: 3
Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 100 with grade of "C" or better
Hours:54 lecture
Examination of psychological principles and theory emphasizing both contemporary and historical research on the influence of culture on human mind and behavior. Topics include the interplay between culture and developmental processes, cognition, emotion, motivation, world-view development, communication, gender, sexuality, health, social behaviors and cultural evolution. (CSU)

Program Student Learning Outcomes (PSLOs)

  • Appraise the research methods used in the field of psychology.
  • Apply critical thinking skills to evaluate the credibility of research, theories, and applications in the field of psychology.
  • Differentiate the core fields, paradigms, and theories of psychology.
  • Apply psychological concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology to questions and issues in their own lives and in contemporary society.
  • Describe and apply ethical standards in academic and applied psychology.